Researchers link climate change to miscarriages 
A study that started in 2017 and finished late last year warns that hot summers can double the risk of miscarriages and stillbirths, even in cooler countries such as the UK or Canada. 

Alexa Posa

March 21, 2024

Researchers warn warmer temperatures can double the risk of miscarriages for pregnant women.

Researchers link climate change to miscarriages 

A study that started in 2017 and finished late last year warns that hot summers can double the risk of miscarriages and stillbirths, even in cooler countries such as the UK or Canada. 

The Faculty of Public Health at the Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research studied 800 pregnant women in southern India. 

The study explored “the relationship between occupational heat exposure, physiological heat strain indicators, and adverse outcomes in pregnant women.”

Roughly 400 of the women worked outside where it was hot, and the other half worked in cooler environments such as schools and hospitals. All participants were from the same state of Tamil Nadu.

Researchers found that the women who worked outside were twice as likely to have a miscarriage than their counterparts.

The women in cooler environments had a 2% risk of a miscarriage while the women working outside had increased their risk to 5%. 

In the same direction, the risk of a still or premature birth was 2.6% compared to 6.1%, and a low birth weight risk 4.5% compared to 8.4%.

The researchers recommended women in warmer climates to avoid persistent time in the sun, properly shade themselves when exposed to heat, avoid exercise and tanning on hotter days, and keep hydrated to limit any pregnancy risks. 

BBC reported on the study with comment from a UK-based professor saying that Indian women are at “the forefront of experiencing climate change.”

World Health Organization warns of “existential threat” 

The World Health Organization (WHO) has also connected climate change with an increased pregnancy risk, even calling the issue an “existential threat.” 

“Pregnant women, babies, and children face extreme health risks from climate catastrophes that warrant urgent attention,” their website states. 

It further reads: “Harm can begin even in the womb, leading to pregnancy-related complications” and for kids, “consequences can last a lifetime, affecting the development of their bodies and brains as they grow.”

The WHO’s Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus has recently been warning the world about a non-existent “Disease X” that he warned could be 20x worse than COVID.

Share this story

Help Keep your News Free

Share this story

It's crucial we stay in touch

Big Tech wants to censor us, that’s why you need to stay in touch.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE THESE...

Trending News

If you thought paper straws dissolving in your drink was annoying, things are probably going to get a whole lot worse as companies are pressured into finding ways to move away from plastic all together.

TCS Wire

April 22, 2024

Trending News

“Under a “climate lockdown,” governments would limit private-vehicle use, ban consumption of red meat, and impose extreme energy-saving measures, while fossil-fuel companies would have to stop drilling.”

Keean Bexte

April 19, 2024

Trending News

The feds introduced Canada’s first ever vaccine compensation program in 2020, just before they coerced vaccines into Canadians by threatening their livelihoods, jobs, and EI. 

Mike Campbell

April 18, 2024

Trending News

A group of concerned citizens took notice of what they perceived to be government overreach regarding the National Urban Park Initiative and are taking action.

Alexa Posa

April 18, 2024

Trending News

“I think Minister Freeland is the heaviest spending finance minister we’ve had in decades.”

TCS Wire

April 18, 2024

Trending News

When asked about the financial disparities between the two parties, Smith said NDP Leader Rachel Notley “ran her party into the ground.”

Alexa Posa

April 17, 2024

We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners who may combine it with other information that you’ve provided to them or that they’ve collected from your use of their services. You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.