Covid vaccine uptake correlated with massive spike in disability claims, data shows
Research from Phinance Technologies shows that disability claims in the US have skyrocketed since the Covid vaccine rollout.

Mike Campbell

March 29, 2023

Research from Phinance Technologies shows that disability claims in the US have skyrocketed since the Covid vaccine rollout.

Covid vaccine uptake correlated with massive spike in disability claims, data shows

Analysts broke down the impact of the Covid-19 vaccines into different categories, including the rise in disabilities and the relationship with vaccine uptake.

The analysts used monthly data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics from 2008 up to November 2022.

“There seems to be clear evidence of a strong relationship between the Covid-19 vaccination rollout and increases in disability rates,” researchers said.

The civilian labor force — meaning those actively working — saw a 23.5% increase in disability claims between May 2021 and November 2022. This increase occurred in both younger and older individuals. 

Researchers attributed the increase to a number of factors, including delayed diagnosis of disabilities acquired during the lockdowns, long Covid syndrome, and vaccine side effects.

This increase comes after a slow decline in disability claims between 2008 and 2020.

The researchers also compiled data on excess deaths, and found a strong correlation with the noted rise in disability claims.

As previously reported, the Canadian government has acknowledged over 10,000 Canadians have suffered a “serious” injury from the Covid vaccine.

At least fifty Canadians injured by the Covid-19 vaccine have been awarded a combined $2.7 million after filing a claim with the federal government’s injury reporting system. 

Over in Germany, health minister Karl Lauterbach recently admitted he regrets a tweet he made in 2021 when he said the Covid vaccines have no side effects. 

“That was an exaggeration that I once made in an ill-considered tweet. It did not represent my true position.”

In a televised interview, Minister Lauterbach stated that Covid vaccine injuries are rare, but he sympathizes with Germans who have been seriously injured from the jabs, and expects Big Pharma vaccine manufacturers to assist with vaccine injury compensation.

“That’s because the profits have been exorbitant,” he said. “Simply exorbitant profits.”

Share this story

Help Keep your News Free

Share this story

It's crucial we stay in touch

Big Tech wants to censor us, that’s why you need to stay in touch.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE THESE...

Trending News

HHS Assistant Secretary Dawn O’Connell added that federal health officials are also looking to Big Pharma companies like Pfizer and Moderna for mRNA solutions—despite the widely known and widespread health issues brought on by their use during the COVID pandemic.

Keean Bexte

May 25, 2024

Trending News

Researchers announce a new experimental mRNA vaccine has shown to be “highly effective” in mitigating symptoms in animals infected with H5N1.

Mike Campbell

May 24, 2024

Trending News

It appears side effects weren’t so rare after all, and AstraZeneca knows it. 

Mike Campbell

May 22, 2024

Trending News

AstraZenica throws in the towel on COVID vaccines, weeks after investing a billion (CAD) into pandemic preparedness.

Mike Campbell

May 7, 2024

Trending News

The feds introduced Canada’s first ever vaccine compensation program in 2020, just before they coerced vaccines into Canadians by threatening their livelihoods, jobs, and EI. 

Mike Campbell

April 18, 2024

Trending News

Dr. Mark Hyman commits (intentional?) Freudian to address the elephant in the room.

Mike Campbell

April 4, 2024

We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners who may combine it with other information that you’ve provided to them or that they’ve collected from your use of their services. You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.