Alberta breaks record for housing starts
Data from the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation has revealed that there were 13,560 new housing starts in the first four months of 2024—an over 60% increase from the same period last year—putting Alberta on track for a record year of housing development likely to continue into the future.

Keean Bexte

May 21, 2024

The Province of Alberta has managed to reach a new milestone in housing starts while the rest of the country suffocates under red tape.

Alberta breaks record for housing starts

Data from the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation has revealed that there were 13,560 new housing starts in the first four months of 2024—a new record for the province and an over 60% increase from the same period last year—putting Alberta on track for a record year of housing development likely to continue into the future.

At the current rate, Alberta is now on pace for roughly 40,000 new housing starts (and construction season hasn’t even started). For comparison, the province saw 27,325, 24,023, 31,935, 36,544, and 36,022 new housing starts in 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023, respectively.

This is happening while Canada as a whole has seen a nearly 10% decrease in new housing starts over the same period, with the PM promising an unprecedented housing boom he’s demonstrably incapable of delivering.

As noted by Alberta Minister Jason Nixon, “This unprecedented growth shows the province is leading the country in having the fewest roadblocks and fastest permit approval times to enable housing construction and increase the supply of homes. We will continue to support our housing partners to make sure we can turn these starts into safe, secure and affordable homes ready for Albertans to move into.”

Alberta has also made strides in rental starts, with 25,447 in the 3 years between 2021 and 2023 compared to 25,285 rental starts in the 15 years between 2006 and 2020, showing the province’s commitment to picking up the pace of development to accommodate new immigrants and all of the native-born Canadians fleeing other provinces.

Share this story

Share this story

It's crucial we stay in touch

Big Tech wants to censor us, that’s why you need to stay in touch.

We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners who may combine it with other information that you’ve provided to them or that they’ve collected from your use of their services. You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.